mYTHICAL pLACES of the British Isles

a COLLECTION OF PRINTS DEPICTING scenes from medieval myths related to sites in the british isles

Lough Neagh.jpg

The Formation of Lough Neagh

print run of 100; £42 with free postage. Please contact me to purchase or for more information. A3 paper, 15x23cm block.

Gerald Cambrensis, The Topography of Ireland, ca 1188, translated by Thomas Forester

“There was a common proverb in the mouths of the tribe, that whenever the well-spring of that country was left uncovered […] it would immediately overflow and inundate the whole province. […] It happened, however, that a young woman, who had come to the spring to draw water, after filling her pitcher but before she had closed the well, ran in great haste to her little boy […]. On her way back, she met such a flood of water from the spring that it swept off her and the little boy, and the inundation was so violent that they both, and the whole tribe, with their cattle, were drowned in an hour […]. A not improbable confirmation of this occurrence is found in the fact that the fisherman in that lake see distinctly under the water, in calm weather, ecclesiastical towers.”

The Rhymer's Tower

Thomas of Erceldoune journeys to Elfland with the Fairy Queen

print run of 100; £42 with free postage. Please contact me to purchase or for more information. A3 paper, 15x23cm block.

The Ballad of Thomas of Erceldoune (now Earlston, Scotland), ca 1400, own translation

“She led him to the Eildon Hills, underneath the greenwood lea, where it was dark as any hell and the water came up to his knees. For the space of three days he heard nothing but the flood. When he said, ‘Woe is me! I am half dead from hunger!’, she led him into a fair garden.”

Lud's Church.jpg

Gawain enters the Green Chapel

print run of 100; £42 with free postage. Please contact me to purchase or for more information. A3 paper, 15x23cm block.

Gawain and the Green Knight, ca 1390, with Lud’s Church as the Green Chapel, translated by A. S. Kline

“‘Now indeed,’ quoth Gawain, ‘desolation is here; this oratory is ugly, with weeds overgrown; well is it seemly for the man clad in green to deal his devotion here in the devil’s wise. Now I feel it’s the Fiend, in my five senses, who set me this meeting to strike at me here. This is a chapel of mischance – bad luck it betide! It is the most cursed church that ever I came to.’ With high helm on his head, his lance in his hand, he roamed up to the roof of that rough dwelling. Then he heard from that high hill, from a hard rock beyond the brook, on the bank, a wondrous brave noise. What! It clanged through the cliff as if it would cleave it, as if on a grindstone one ground a great scythe. What! It whirred and whetted, as water in a mill. What! It rushed and rang, revolting to hear.”

Waylands smithy.jpg

Wayland’s Smithy

print run of 100; £42 with free postage. Please contact me to purchase or for more information. A3 paper, 15x23cm block.

The Lay of Wayland, ca 10th century, translated by Henry Adams Bellows

“East fared Egil after Olrun, / And Slagfith south to seek for Swan-White. / Völund alone in Ulfdalir lay, / Red gold he fashioned | with fairest gems, / And rings he strung on ropes of bast; / So for his wife he waited long, / If the fair one home might come to him. /This Nithuth learned, the lord of the Njars, / That Völund alone in Ulfdalir lay; / By night went his men, their mail-coats were studded,/ Their shields in the waning | moonlight shone. / From their saddles the gable wall they sought. / And in they went at the end of the hall; / Rings they saw there on ropes of bast, / Seven hundred the hero had. / Off they took them, but all they left / Save one alone which they bore away.”